How Is Your Color Vision?

Like many of you, we occasionally take some time to take a quiz now and again on BuzzFeed. We found this one interesting and thought we would share it.  If you are having trouble seeing colors, perhaps we can help. Click here to schedule an eye exam.

 

June is Cataract Awareness Month

Some 24 million Americans over the age of 40 are affected by cataracts. Prevent Blindness America declared June as Cataract Awareness Month and so here we are shining a light on this treatable condition. Cataract is one of the leading causes of blindness in the United States. If not treated, cataracts can lead to blindness. In addition, the longer cataracts are left untreated, the more difficult it can be to successfully remove the cataract and restore vision. Cataracts are a clouding of the lens of the eye, which prevents passage of light into the eye. The solution to cataracts is cataract surgery, which requires a surgeon to remove the deteriorated lens and replace it with an artificial lens called an intraocular lens or IOL. Over 3 million Americans undergo cataract surgery annually, making it one of the most common surgeries in the United States.

There is no proven way to prevent age-related cataracts. However, choosing a healthy lifestyle can slow the progression of cataracts. Some ways to delay the progression of cataracts include avoiding smoking, reducing exposure to UV rays, eating healthy foods, and wearing proper eye protection to avoid eye injury. People who smoke at least 20 cigarettes per day have twice the risk of developing cataracts as compared to nonsmokers. Obviously, the best course of action is early detection of cataracts. Click here and schedule a comprehensive eye exam with us today!

Online Colorblind Test

How colorblind are you? Most of us suffer some degree of colorblindness, especially as we age. Men suffer from colorblindness at a much higher rate than women. Here is a fun colorblindness test you can take online from your desktop computer. If your score is higher (worse) than you expected, call us to schedule an eye exam and let’s see if we can help you see better and clearer.

Color Test   Online Color Challenge   X Rite

Halloween Contact Lenses – Buyer Beware

Halloween is a very fun time of year. Dressing up is great fun, no matter how young or how old you are. For the most part it is all harmless fun. Did you know however, that those costume contact lenses you might be considering could not only be a violation of the law, but could permanently damage your eyesight? We certainly don’t want to rain on anyone’s parade, but as eye care professionals, we see and hear horror stories about what happens to those who cut corners and put their own eyesight at risk just for the fun of one evening. Take a look at this infographic from the folks at Eye-Q Vision. If you are determined that contact lenses be part of your costume we encourage you to contact us first, so that we can help you do it right.

Infographic-Halloween-Contact-Lenses[1]

Get Sun Smart

Summer is fast approaching and as the weather warms, we will all spend more time outside. This is a great time to get a new pair of sunglasses for every member of your family. The folks at eyeSmart and the American Academy of Ophthalmology have put together this infographic on being Sun Smart and educating us on the importance of sunwear to protect our eyes.

EyeSmartSunSmartWebCR[2]

Blink!

The average persons blink their eyes about 11,500 times per day and about 4.2 million times per years.

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October is Eye Injury Prevention Month

Ocotber

Did you know that every year over 2.5 million eye injuries occur in the United States resulting in over 50,000 people permanently losing all or part of their vision?  According to the American Academy of Ophthalmology, the annual costs related to eye injuries cost more $1.3 billion. While 800,000 of those injuries occur on the job, which leaves some 1.3 million injuries that happen at home. Eye injuries can occur from a variety of common sources, such as flying debris from lawn mowers or trimmers, or splashes from household cleaners, paints or solvents. Most eye injuries can be prevented by wearing eye protection.

Knowing what to do for an eye emergency can save valuable time and possibly prevent vision loss. Prevent Blindness America offers a free “First Aid for Eye Emergencies” sticker in both English and Spanish that can be placed on the inside of a medicine cabinet.  Basic eye injury first aid instructions include:

Chemical Burns to the Eye

  • Immediately flush the eye with water or any other drinkable liquid. Hold the eye under a faucet or shower, or pour water into the eye using a clean container. Keep the eye open and as wide as possible while flushing. Continue flushing for at least 15 minutes.
  • DO NOT use an eyecup. DO NOT bandage the eye.
  • If a contact lens is in the eye, begin flushing over the lens immediately. This may wash away the lens.
  • Seek immediate medical treatment after flushing.

Specks in the Eye

  • DO NOT rub the eye.
  • Try to let tears wash the speck out or use an eyewash.
  • Try lifting the upper eyelid outward and down over the lower lid.
  • If the speck does not wash out, keep the eye closed, bandage it lightly, and see a doctor.

Blows to the Eye

  • Apply a cold compress without putting pressure on the eye. Crushed ice in a plastic bag can be taped to the forehead to rest gently on the injured eye.
  • In cases of pain, reduced vision, or discoloration (black eye), seek emergency medical care. Any of these symptoms could mean internal eye damage.

Cuts and Punctures of the Eye or Eyelid

  • DO NOT wash out the eye with water or any other liquid.
  • DO NOT try to remove an object that is stuck in the eye.
  • Cover the eye with a rigid shield without applying pressure. The bottom half of a paper cup can be used.
  • See a doctor at once.

For more information on how to protect the eyes at home, eye protection recommendations, or to request the First Aid for Eye Emergencies sticker, call Prevent Blindness America at (800) 331-2020 or visit their website preventblindness.org.

 

Colorblind?

Did you know that upwards of 8% of men are colorblind? No, we are not talking about the tie they chose to wear with that shirt, though perhaps for some men, that is a very legitimate excuse. Women are affected far less with only 1 out of every 200 affected by colorblindness. The light sensitive tissue lining the inner surface of our eyes is called the retina. The retina is made up of rods and cones. The rods give us our night vision but do not distinguish color. The cones perceive color.

The cones, each contain a light sensitive pigment which is sensitive over a range of wavelengths (each visible color is a different wavelength from approximately 400 to 700 nm). Genes contain the coding instructions for these pigments, and if the coding instructions are wrong, then the wrong pigments will be produced, and the cones will be sensitive to different wavelengths of light (resulting in a color deficiency). The colors that we see are completely dependent on the sensitivity ranges of those pigments.

People with normal cones and light sensitive pigment  are able to see all the different colors and subtle mixtures of them by using cones sensitive to one of three wavelength of light – red, green, and blue. A mild color deficiency is present when one or more of the three cones light sensitive pigments are not quite right and their peak sensitivity is shifted.  A more severe color deficiency is present when one or more of the cones light sensitive pigments is really wrong.

There is not one type of colorblindness. Each of us have different color sensitivities. Take a look at these Ishihara color tests to see what numbers you see in each plate. The answers are at the bottom of the page. If you have trouble reading any of these, please call us and schedule an eye exam with Dr. Lori and let her work out a solution for you.

Plate111[2]

Plate213[1]

Plate311[1]Plate411[1]Plate81[2]

Plate111[2]

 

 

 

12, 8, 29, 5, 6, 7

 

 

 

 

Protect Yourself From Eye Injuries

As safe as we would all like to think we are, accidents happen.  43 Americans are treated for work related eye injuries ever second of every day. Even off the job we expose our eyes to injury. Every 13 minutes someone is visiting an ER due to a sports eye injury. At Taft Optical, we take your eyesight personally. We have one the best selection of the finest eyeglasses, sunglasses and lenses available in the state to help you see better and to protect your vision. We even have a great selection of safety glasses and goggles in which we can put your personal prescription in. Check out this infographic and be sure to let us help take care of your eyesight.

Health-info-eye-injury

Benefits of Polarized Lenses

Polarized sunglasses are not just for summer fun. Polarized lenses help reduce glare and reduce eye stress as well, so they are great for driving. They provide for better contrast, enhanced clarity and more. Here is an infographic from the folks at GKB Opticals showing the benefits of polarized lenses.

polarised-glasses